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It’s Just Not Good Enough Ultra Tune

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It’s Just Not Good Enough Ultra Tune

Imagine hiring a convicted rapist to be the new face of your brand? Seems ludicrous, doesn’t it?

But that’s just what Ultra Tune’s CEO, Sean Buckley has announced last week securing Mike Tyson, as the new face of their upcoming campaign. If their previous commercials have anything to go by, I expect women (and many men) across Australia to be outraged, when their style of deplorable and sexist advertisements hit the airwaves in January next year just in time for the Australian Open. It’s certainly not the kind of advertisement I want any of my children to view while they watch the tennis (or any other time for that matter).

Let me remind you of just why Ultra Tune produce some of the most complained about advertisements in Australia. Who can forget Jean-Claude Van Damme and his ‘rubber girls’ which appeared in 2016? It was one of the most complained about advertisements of the year. In it, we see rubber-clad women on a dark road with a broken-down vehicle when a group of dangerous men appear looking for trouble, and Jean-Claude Van Damme appears to save the day. In another subsequently banned ad, two scantily clad women appear to be facing imminent death when their convertible car gets stuck on train tracks.  Women complained in droves upset with women being seen as sex objects and unintelligent bimbos.

Ultra Tune’s strategy is incredibly foolish. There are 6.2 million mothers in this country, and GlobalData reports they are responsible for $132 billion in spending every year. Not only do mothers control more than 80% of consumer spending, they also significantly influence the purchasing decisions of their extended family and friends. I have no doubt that mothers will gather on social media to share their distaste at Ultra Tune’s decision once they become aware of this new Ultra Tune campaign.

My organisation recently teamed up with a leading marketing academic from RMIT University and surveyed more than 1800 Australian mums to identify the key mistakes brands make when attempting to connect and engage with mothers. Ultra Tune breaks almost every one of the nine mistakes identified including the top three of stereotyping, treating women like they are stupid and not being real. The decision for Ultra Tune to continue these campaigns will come at a long-term cost to the brand. Australian mums won’t forget in a hurry.

Women represent a growing market within the automotive industry. Research by AutoChic.com claims that women purchase 70% of all new vehicles in Australia. They need to service those cars, and I’m sure Ultra Tune will not be top of mind. Why would you choose to alienate them? The advertising choices made by Ultra Tune will have long-term damage for the brand and will repel mothers from ever buying from them.

As marketers and business owners I believe strongly that we have a corporate and moral responsibility to avoid using socially unacceptable stereotypes and sexist advertising. The actions by Sean Buckley and his team at Ultra Tune work against my objective to change the way we speak to mothers and women in our society.

So, I call on you men and women of Australia; it is time to use the power of your purse or wallet and think very carefully about where you get your car serviced.

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“The opinions expressed by Smallville Contributors are their own, not those of www.smallville.com.au"



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